Dr. Christina J. Johns
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Dr. Christina J. Johns

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Book reviews, movie reviews, classic movie picks, classic actor picks, a discussion about all things arty. 

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Lady of Shanghai

Posted on June 30, 2020 at 12:50 AM Comments comments (0)

 

Lady of Shanghai (1948)

Starring Orson Welles, Rita Hayworth, Everett Sloane, Glenn Anders

Directed by Orson Welles

Screenplay by Orson Welles based on a Sherwood King novel, “If I Die Before I Wake.”

Orson Welles had trouble getting along with Hollywood studios from the beginning of his career. Lady of Shanghai (1948), was no different.

Studio head Harry Cohn was so obsessed with Rita Hayworth he had her wiretapped. When the studio gave Welles Hayworth to develop “Lady of Shanghai” around, they evidently wanted something like “Gilda.” Welles did not give them a “Gilda.”

Hayworth was famous for her long red hair. The first thing Welles did was to get her hair cut short and dye it blond. This set him up in opposition Harry Cohn from the very beginning.

But, Welles had been guaranteed artistic license on this film. Cohn said afterward he would never again allow anybody to be actor, director and writer in one film because he couldn’t then fire them. He must have wanted to fire Welles many times during this production.

Welles had been married to Hayworth, but they were estranged at the time of the making of “Lady of Shanghai.” Hayworth nevertheless agreed to be in the film. Some thought Welles’ interpretation of her character in the film was a devastating portrayal of Hayworth herself. Some found it uncomfortably personal and vicious. Cohn thought the film would ruin her career and shelved it for a year.

Cohn instructed Welles to insert “glamour” shots of Hayworth. And because of the success of Hayworth singing in Gilda, he made Welles insert a sequence in which Hayworth sings “Please don’t Kiss Me.”

And Hayworth’s treatment wasn’t the only thing studio bosses objected to. When the first version of the completed film was shown to bosses, Cohn is said to have stood up and offered anyone in the room $1,000 to explain the plot to him. TCM film noir commentator, Eddie Muller, called “Lady from Shanghai” a “train wreck.”

Welles wasn’t much more liked by his actors than he was by studio bosses. Everett Sloan who puts in a wonderful performance as the sleazy and creepy husband had to go so far as refusing to wear the braces Welles had constructed for his character. Sloan complained that the braces were extremely painful. In the film, he uses two canes and a riveting walk.

Similarly, Glenn Anders found Welles to be difficult. He said that Welles bullied him relentlessly. Welles maintained, of course, that this treatment just pushed Anders to give a more nervous and edgy performance. Whether Anders or Welles is responsible, Anders is impossible to take your eyes off in the film. He appears and appears again like a bad dream.

Like he did with many of his films, Welles had walked off the post-production process before it was completed. As with “The Magnificent Ambersons” the ending was substantially changed by the studio. Welles had been so involved in the famous final sequence where Hayworth and her husband kill each other in a shootout in a house of mirrors, he helped construct and paint the set. But in his final version, this scene lasted 10 minutes. The studio cut it down to 4.

I have always wondered why I didn’t particularly like “Lady from Shanghai.” It was interesting to read that others didn’t like it either. But, this “train wreck” has some stunning scenes (like the fun house scenes at the end) and is worth another view.

Oh, just a note, the dog seen with Hayworth on the yacht belonged to Errol Flynn. Welles rented Flynn’s yacht for the film and Flynn stipulated in the contract that the yacht couldn’t be used unless he was present. When Flynn went off on a toot, filming had to shut down until they found him.

 


Accisents Will Happen (1938)

Posted on June 28, 2020 at 7:15 PM Comments comments (0)

ACCIDENTS WILL HAPPEN (1938)

Director: William Clemens

Writers: George Bricker and Anthony Coldeway (screen play) from a story by George Bricker

Starring: Ronald Reagan, Sheila Bromley, Gloria Blondell, Dick Purcell

Ronald Reagan as an insurance fraud investigator with a greedy wife who gets involved with a big fraud gang.

I had no idea Joan Blondell even had a sister until I happened on this film. The lesser-known sister, Gloria, made something like two dozen Hollywood features. In the 1940s she played the voice of Disney’s Daisy Duck. She did television in the 1950s (I love Lucy and The Life of Riley)

The sisters started off as part of a vaudeville troupe “The Bouncing Blondells.”

Ronald Reagan was 27 when he made this movie, but he looks much younger. He plays pretty much his standard part – smart, cocky guy.

Shiela Bromley as the greedy wife is probably the most impressive of the actors. She had small parts in a great many Hollywood movies and then went on to do a lot of television.

This is an unambitious, but well put together B film. The honest young insurance man gets done badly by his wife and has to take on the insurance fraud gangs to get his reputation back (and a better girl).

Sociologically, the notable part of the film is a sequence involving just one of the numerous insurance fraud schemes. The fraud schemes organized by the gang involve hiring people to jump out of a car before it goes over a cliff, falling down a set of outside stairs in a bus and other faked car accidents.

But, one of these schemes illustrates just how casual and heartless the racism of the time was in films. This is the only one of the schemes to involve a person of color, the only one where the person hired is a dupe or portrayed as an object of fun (except a guy who pretends to be drunk).

The first scene to set this up is in a doctor’s office where the doctor is fooling with a wooden brace. A black man is sitting in a chair. The doctor puts the black man’s arm in the brace and starts to use a hammer to break the arm. The black man objects. The gang member says: You signed up for this job. The black may says, Yeah, but I changed my mind. The gang member offers him more money and the black man agrees asking for the doctor to break his arm gently.

Then, we see the black man standing on a street corner, waiting for a car driven by one of the gang members to come down the street. He walks right in front of the car and is sideswiped. He then gets up and complains loudly about his broken arm.

This incident involves the only real physical harm that comes to any of the stooges hired by the gang. The other people are playing parts, or in one case, an acrobat who knows how to fall.

It’s painful to watch the doctor swing the hammer as he tries to come down on the black man’s arm, and it’s disturbing to watch the man be sideswiped by the oncoming car. It’s also notable that the black man is portrayed as somewhat stupid and overly impressed by the money. The other stooges are cynical, playing a part, people obviously used to acting as stooges.

Article about racism and the early Hoillywood films.

http://eskify.com/10-racist-films-early-hollywood/

Note: I have to correct part of the post from yesterday. Peter Lorre did have dialogue in the film just at the end right before he is hit by a truck and killed.

 


Mrs. Danvers

Posted on May 18, 2020 at 6:25 PM Comments comments (0)

 

 

Chapter 14

• Chapter 14 contains the iconic confrontation between Mrs. Danvers and the narrator in Rebecca’s bedroom.

• Rather than being covered with drop cloths, she finds the room “fully furnished, as though in use.” There are flowers, Rebecca’s personal items like brushes and combs.

• There is the scent of white azalea and a dressing gown that “had not been touched or laundered since it was last worn.”

• Mrs. Danvers appears “Triumphant, gloating, excited in a strange unhealthy way.” The narrator feels “frightened.”

• Mrs. Danvers says she was “ready to show it to” her every day. She seems (in the narrator’s words) “excited” to show her the room and the personal items.

• In an odd and intimate action, Mrs. Danvers “forced the slippers over my hands.”

• Mrs. Danvers tells the narrator that Maxim was “always laughing and gay then.”

• After the confrontation, the narrator felt “bruised and numb from the pressure of her fingers.”

• Mrs. Danvers starts to spin a spell over the narrator saying: “Listen to the sea.” Maxim was pacing “up and down, up and down.” “I feel her everywhere. You do too, don’t you?” “sometimes I wonder…Sometimes I wonder if she comes back here to Manderley and watches you and Mr. de Winter together.”

• The narrator describes Danny’s “white skull’s face of hers, how malevolent, how full of hatred.”

• After the confrontation, the narrator goes back to her bedroom. “I felt deadly sick.”

 

Judith Anderson as Mrs. Danvers

 

(1897-1992)

 

Judith Anderson was an Australian actress who was a success on stage, and in film and television. After trying and failing in California and New York, she finally made a Broadway debut in 1922. She the toured in Australia and New Zealand. And worked in California and London.

 

She was nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1941 for Rebecca.

 

Notable Films

Rebecca (1940)

Kings Row (1942)

Laura (1944)

The Strange Love of Martha Ivers (1946)

The Ten Commandments (1956)

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958)

 


Rebecca: Chapter 13 and George Sanders

Posted on May 17, 2020 at 4:50 PM Comments comments (0)

 

Chapter 13

• It’s not difficult to understand the relief the narrator feels when Maxim finally leaves the house for once. If you think about all the tension that is involved with worrying about what he thinks, what he is thinking about (Rebecca), and what somebody might say that would set him off, it’s exhausting.

• It’s an interesting exposition of the way in which women live in the imagined minds of men. How does he see me? How does he think of me? Am I presenting the right image?

• It reminds me of what I have read about adolescent females these days, posting dozens of versions of a selfie and asking their friends which one is just right, living in fear of presenting the “wrong” image. It must be crazy making.

• The narrator thinks: “If Maxim had been there I should not be lying as I was now, chewing a piece of grass, my eyes shut. I should have been watching him, watching his eyes, his expression. Wondering if he liked it, if he was bored.”

• Rebecca is such an interesting detailing of female insecurity.

• The narrator enters the cottage at the beach and after Jasper barks hysterically, she perceived a figure “sitting in the corner against the wall.” “It was Ben.”

• Ben reveals that he is terrified of being sent to an asylum (something Rebecca threatened him with), and the keen observation that the narrator is “not like the other one.”

• “She gave you the feeling of a snake.” He says of Rebecca.

• I’m not sure, but I’m wondering if this is the first time we knew that Rebecca was a terrible person. Before, wasn’t she just described as beautiful, accomplished, whatever? She was threatening for sure, but were we certain that she wasn’t just threatening to the narrator?

• But then, as always in this novel, du Maurier refuses to allow us to stand on solid ground. The has the narrator remembering that Ben is “an idiot.”

• As she walks up to the house, she notices a car parked down the drive, not at the usual place in front of the house. Then, she notices that there is a window opened in the west (Rebecca’s) wing. And, then, there is a man (another menacing man) standing by the window.

• She notices that her things have been moved in the morning room, things like her knitting. There is even an imprint of a person on the sofa.

• “I did not want to catch Mrs. Danvers in the wrong.” I love this sentence. She is the mistress of the house. Mrs. Danvers is the one doing wrong, but she is so intimidated by Mrs. Danvers that she is dodging and weaving to keep from finding Mrs. Danvers in the wrong.

• She is standing behind a door when Favel comes into the room. When Jasper barks at her, Favell turns around and is surprised. She says: “I have never seen anyone look more astonished.”

• But in the film, Favel is outside the library window and catches her hiding behind the door. She is the one to turn and is surprised.

• I love Favell as a character, in part because I love George Sanders. In the novel she says that Favell was “smiling at me in a familiar way.” That’s George Sanders’ specialty.

• He makes fun of the narrator by telling Danny that she was “hiding behind the door.”

• Favell then enlists the narrator in sharing a secret, or keeping a secret from Maxim, a sort of compromised position, a betrayal.

• It is an interesting comment on the weakness of her character that she agrees to this even though she knows that Maxim (in his own words) doesn’t approve of him and doesn’t know he is there.

• Whether she agrees to this because she is afraid of Danny or she wants so desperately to please Favell, or everybody, the reader doesn’t know.

 

George Sanders (1906-1972)

 

Sanders’ career as an actor spanned over forty years. He was often cast as a sophisticated but villainous character. His voice is unmistakable. You can walk into a room and hear that voice and know immediately that it is either him or his brother (Tim Conway).

Born in Russia, his family left on the eve of the Russian Revolution and went to England. While working in an advertising agency, the agency secretary (Greer Garson) suggested he take up acting as a career.

 

Other films:

Strange Cargo (1936)

Foreign Correspondent (1940)

All About Eve (1950, for which he won the Oscar)

The Picture of Dorian Grey (1945)

The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (1947)

The Saint (five films made between 1930 and the 1940s). Conway, Sanders older brother took over the role when Sanders tired of it.

 

Sanders was once suspended by United Artists for refusing to play the lead in “The Undying Monster” (1942). Sanders commented: “I’d like to be seen in pictures that at least seem to be slightly worthwhile.”

 

Fox initially announced him for the male lead (the detective) in Laura (1944), but he ended up not being in the film. Later, he appeared in a remake of Laura playing the role of Waldo Lydecker on “The 20th Century-Fox Hour.”

Sanders appeared with Peter Sellers in “A Shot in the Dark” (1964).

In 1967, he was in a film “Good Times” with Sonny and Cher. This may well have been what did him in.

In 1966 he declared bankruptcy. In 1969, after appearing in drag and playing the piano in John Huston’s “The Kremlin Letter,” he announced he was leaving show business.

Sanders was married to Zsa Zsa Gabor and Benita Hume, the widow of Ronald Colman. In 1967, Sanders’ brother, his mother, and his wife died. He has an autobiography “Memoirs of a Professional Cad” (1960). Brian Aherne wrote a biography of Sanders (1979). In 1970, he married Zsa Zsa’s older sister, Magda Gabor. The marriage lasted only 32 days after which he started drinking heavily.

In his last films, Sanders suffered from lack of balance and dementia. He grew reclusive and depressed (who wouldn’t). He found out he could no longer play the piano and so dragged it outside and smashed it with an axe. He died after swallowing five bottles of barbiturates. He left three suicide notes. One said: “I am leaving because I am bored….I am leaving you with your worries in this sweet cesspool. Good luck.

David Niven said that Sanders had told him in 1937 that he (Sanders) would commit suicide from barbiturates.

 

 



Where to Watch Rebecca

Posted on May 13, 2020 at 7:30 PM Comments comments (0)

 

 

Several people have asked where they could watch Rebecca (1940) since we're all confined. This is a site called Black and White Movies where you can watch on your computer.

 

If you have access to Netflix, I would strongly suggest you order the DVD. As I wrote the other day, the DVD includes a version in which there is narration throughout the entire movie about the making of the film. It's fascinating. In addition, there's an interview with Haskell, the film reviewer, which is also interesting.

 

http://www.bnwmovies.com/rebecca.html

 

Miss you all. Look forward to having a group discussion about these films and novels later. Keep well.

Christina, [email protected], 912-399-8481, Facebook: St. Simons Library Novel and Movie Series, www.christinajjohns.com, or www.islandcatpaws.com


Rebecca: Chapter 12

Posted on May 11, 2020 at 6:30 PM Comments comments (0)


Hitchcock: Rebecca Chapter 9

Posted on May 6, 2020 at 7:45 PM Comments comments (0)

Chapter 9

• When Maxim’s sister, Beatrice, and her husband arrive, the narrator wants to “hide, to get out of the window into the garden…” despising herself as she seeks an escape.

• The mention that you can leave through the window foreshadows the appearance of Rebecca’s cousin, Favell, in the window.

• In trying to escape Beatrice, she tries to find her room, Instead, she goes into the other wing of the house – the Rebecca wing.

• The narrator notes that from this wing you can view and smell the sea which is used as a threatening symbol, associated with Rebecca. In wonderful imagery, the narrator says that the mist upon the window is “as though someone had breathed upon it.”

• The narrator describes Mrs. Danvers’ face as a “mask,” and compares her to a “warden.”

• When the narrator is caught (by Mrs. Danvers) in the other wing, she feels “guilty and ashamed…”

• Mrs. Danvers asks her if she wants to see Rebecca’s room and it reminds her of an incident in her childhood, of another child telling her she knew of a book, locked, in her mother’s bedroom. So, the narrator is reminded of an incident that is associated with sexuality and guilt, and secrets.

• There is a debate among scholars about the sexuality of the relationship between Mrs. Danvers and Rebecca. Some see a clear implication of lesbianism.

• The narrator feels that Mrs. Danvers has been watching her, observing her secretly. Building the ominous imagery, as she walks down the stairway, she feels Mrs. Danvers behind her, watching her like “a black sentinel.”

• The narrator finally meets Beatrice, Maxim’s sister. Beatrice looks her “up and down” but the narrator senses “relief” in Beatrice’s eyes.

• Crawley helps steer her through difficult subjects in the conversation thereby establishing himself as an ally.

• She notices that Beatrice says she “hoped” they would be happy, not that she was sure they would be happy. Beatrice comments on her clothes and that Maxim used to be concerned with clothes and appearances.

• Beatrice tells the narrator that Mrs. Danvers “simply adored Rebecca.”

• The narrator feels that Maxim likes her the way she likes Jasper, the dog.

• Beatrice leaves, saying: “You see…you are so very different from Rebecca.”

 


Novel/Movie Series: Hitchcock Before and After Hollywood: Rebecca Chapter 7

Posted on May 2, 2020 at 12:15 AM Comments comments (0)




Chapter 7

Throughout the novel, du Maurier refuses to allow anything to be stable. Everything shifts and changes. There are no certainties and few pauses.

When the narrator and Maxim leave London, it is raining, but Maxim says to the narrator: “you wait, the sun will be shining for you when we come to Manderley.”

Manderley is supposed to be the haven, the citadel the place of peace and security. The narrator’s life has been insecure and Manderley is supposed to be her home, the place of comfort where she arrives a married woman, wife of a rich man.

But, it is far from that for her in reality. “how easy it was for him” she thinks of Maxim, arriving home at Manderley. But, she “dreaded this arrival at Manderley.” She envies the people living in cottages along the way imagining that their lives are “peaceful and steady, that way of living, and easier, too, demanding no set standard.”

But, at Manderley, “They wanted to see what I was like.” She dreads this examination of herself. She imagines, in detail people talking about her, saying bad things about her.

Du Maurier builds the tension of this arrival with a long description of the drive leading up to the house. “The length of it began to nag at my nerves.” And indeed, for the reader, the description goes on so long it provokes impatience.

Then, out of the tension combined with tedium, the impatience created in the reader, comes a clearing right before the house, and then “a wall of colour, blood-red, reaching far above our heads…rhododendrons. There was something bewildering, even shocking about the suddenness of their discovery…They startled me with their crimson faces, massed one upon the other in incredible profusion, showing no lead, no twig, nothing but the slaughterous red, luscious and fantastic, unlike any rhododendron plant I had seen before.” The flowers, representing Rebecca, were to the narrator, “…monsters, rearing to the sky, massed like a battalion too beautiful I thought, too powerful…”

In our first introduction of Mrs. Danvers in person, Maxim states: “Damn that woman.” We realize that Mrs. Danvers has arranged a situation that mirrors the narrator’s worst fears, groups of people, judging people, amassed at the steps of the house.

Then, the narrator describes Mrs. Danvers in a way that is as menacing as can be. “someone tall and gaunt, dressed in deep black, whose prominent cheek-bones and great, hollow eyes gave her a skull’s face, parchment-white, set on a skeleton’s frame.”

Mrs. Danvers is immediately associated with menace and death. The narrator describes shaking hands with her. Mrs. Danvers’ hand was “limp and heavy, deathly cold.” Her voice was “cold and lifeless.” “A black figure stood waiting for me at the head of the stairs, the hollow eyes watching me intently from the white skull’s face.”

The narrator feels a sensation of “discomfort and of shame. “There was a “little smile of scorn upon her lips, and I guessed at once she considered me ill-bred.” She smiles at Mrs. Danvers and the smile is not returned.

Mrs. Danvers takes the narrator to her new bedroom and points out that it has been especially opened and redecorated for her in another wing of the house from the room Maxim shared with Rebecca. Instead of thinking that this is a nice gesture, the narrator (helped along by Mrs. Danvers) feels as if this gesture is about not defiling the bedroom Maxim shared with the perfect Rebecca. She interprets the new room as a “second-rate room…for a second-rate person.”

Mrs. Danvers sets up the theme of the menace of the sea, where Rebecca died. She points out to the narrator that you can’t hear the sea from that room, her bedroom in the new wing. She makes the narrator feel inadequate for not having a personal maid.

Again, the narrator observes Mrs. Danvers: “those eyes that had no light, no flicker of sympathy towards me.” She looked at me with “mixture of pity and of scorn” “she despised me.” Was it, she wonders (because we are never allowed to stand in any position) “positive dislike, or actual malice?”

The narrator feels that Mrs. Danvers is talking about the way things were when Rebecca was there and watching the effect on her face. The look was one of “derision, of definite contempt.” The narrator knows that she fears Mrs. Danvers. And, then she despises herself for trying to gain Mrs. Danvers approval. She notes an “undercurrent of resentment”

 

Rebecca: Chapters 5-6

Posted on April 29, 2020 at 4:25 PM Comments comments (0)

We are doing our Novel/Movie Series "Hitchcock" Before and After Hollywood" online.  This is a summary of two of the chapters of the novel "Rebecca."


Chapter 5

• Maxim explains that “all memories are bitter, and I prefer to ignore them. Something happened a year ago that altered my whole life, and I want to forget every phase of my existence up to that time….I must begin living all over again.” “You have blotted out the past for me.”

• Mrs. Van Hopper gives flesh to the “phantom” the narrator has been pursuing in her mind. Rebeca was, she says, “very lovely. Exquisitely turned out, and brilliant in every way.” Then, she pushes the knife in: “I believe he adored her.”

• Rebecca, even in her handwriting, is everything the narrator is not: ““That bold, slanting hand, stabbing the white paper, the symbol of herself, so certain, so assured.”

 

Chapter 6

• The narrator, unlike Maxim, is keen to stop time, to make her memories of the drive to Manderley last. She feels the time slipping away from her, aware of the fact that they can never stop the fleeting time. “We can never be quite the same again.”

• She wishes to be older, more mature, not so young and foolish.

• Then, she receives a proposal, not a proposal where “men knelt to women,” not in “moonlight,” but over breakfast, and Maxim proposes in an extremely unromantic way: “I’m asking you to marry me, you little fool.” But, propose he does and she starts dreaming of being “mistress of Manderley.”

• But, before the proposal breakfast is over Maxim points out that the tangerine is sour. Then, the narrator notices the same thing: the tangerine is sour and she hadn’t even noticed, much like the marriage may turn out to be.

• And, Maxim had not said anything about being in love.

• The narrator starts to wonder if the proposal to Rebecca had been romantic, not over breakfast, but she tries to control her jealousy. ““Put it away” “Get thee behind me, Satan.”

• Maxim has given her a book of poems and inside she finds a dedication from Rebecca. She notes: “How alive was her writing though, how full of force.” She cuts the page out of the book, tears it up and puts it in the trash. Then, she goes back and sets fire to the fragments.

• But, the past will not disappear. When Mrs, Van Hopper finds out about the engagement, she tries her best to wound the narrator. “I simply can’t see you doing it,” she says. “…you are making a big mistake – one you will bitterly regret.” “…you know why he is marrying you, don’t you?....He just can’t go on living there alone.

 

Rebecca: Chapters 5-6

Posted on April 29, 2020 at 4:25 PM Comments comments (0)

We are doing our Novel/Movie Series "Hitchcock" Before and After Hollywood" online.  This is a summary of two of the chapters of the novel "Rebecca."


Chapter 5

• Maxim explains that “all memories are bitter, and I prefer to ignore them. Something happened a year ago that altered my whole life, and I want to forget every phase of my existence up to that time….I must begin living all over again.” “You have blotted out the past for me.”

• Mrs. Van Hopper gives flesh to the “phantom” the narrator has been pursuing in her mind. Rebeca was, she says, “very lovely. Exquisitely turned out, and brilliant in every way.” Then, she pushes the knife in: “I believe he adored her.”

• Rebecca, even in her handwriting, is everything the narrator is not: ““That bold, slanting hand, stabbing the white paper, the symbol of herself, so certain, so assured.”

 

Chapter 6

• The narrator, unlike Maxim, is keen to stop time, to make her memories of the drive to Manderley last. She feels the time slipping away from her, aware of the fact that they can never stop the fleeting time. “We can never be quite the same again.”

• She wishes to be older, more mature, not so young and foolish.

• Then, she receives a proposal, not a proposal where “men knelt to women,” not in “moonlight,” but over breakfast, and Maxim proposes in an extremely unromantic way: “I’m asking you to marry me, you little fool.” But, propose he does and she starts dreaming of being “mistress of Manderley.”

• But, before the proposal breakfast is over Maxim points out that the tangerine is sour. Then, the narrator notices the same thing: the tangerine is sour and she hadn’t even noticed, much like the marriage may turn out to be.

• And, Maxim had not said anything about being in love.

• The narrator starts to wonder if the proposal to Rebecca had been romantic, not over breakfast, but she tries to control her jealousy. ““Put it away” “Get thee behind me, Satan.”

• Maxim has given her a book of poems and inside she finds a dedication from Rebecca. She notes: “How alive was her writing though, how full of force.” She cuts the page out of the book, tears it up and puts it in the trash. Then, she goes back and sets fire to the fragments.

• But, the past will not disappear. When Mrs, Van Hopper finds out about the engagement, she tries her best to wound the narrator. “I simply can’t see you doing it,” she says. “…you are making a big mistake – one you will bitterly regret.” “…you know why he is marrying you, don’t you?....He just can’t go on living there alone.

 


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